Tim Levene

Augmentum Fintech

CEO

Tim graduated in Russian Studies from The University of Manchester and joined Bain & Company in Moscow, Boston, Sydney and London. Tim embarked on an entrepreneurial path and left Bain in early 1998 and created a new retail concept when he opened his first Juice bar (Fresh n Smooth) in 1999 in Canary Wharf. The business has since evolved into a 31-store business across London called Crussh. In the summer of 1999, Tim joined 3 former colleagues from Bain & Company and launched Flutter.com. Flutter became one of the highest profile internet businesses in the UK after it merged with Betfair.com in 2001. Tim became the Commercial Director of the newly merged business and launched Betfair globally. In 2010, Tim returned to London to start his next venture. He founded Augmentum Capital with the backing of RIT Capital and Lord Rothschild. The team focused on finding talented entrepreneurial teams in the Fintech industry that were bringing fundamentally disruptive products or platforms to the European market. In 2018, Tim and Richard successfully launched Augmentum Fintech on the main market of the London Stock Exchange, in the process becoming the first publicly listed Fintech fund in the UK. Tim was made a Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum in 2012 and for several years advised The Royal Foundation of The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince Harry on digital strategy and innovation. Tim was elected in March 2017 to The Court of Common Council in the City of London to represent the Ward of Bridge. (as an Independent).

Event Sessions Featuring Tim Levene


Panel

An investor perspective: Who will win in wealthtech?

The Digital Wealth Forum - 2nd October 2018

Wealthtech is currently focusing on the investing strategies but are now shifting on to "performing" said Cristophe. He also mentions "there is a demand for data to know what exactly the audience want". 

Tim had the opinion that "robos are struggling for a customer base and are only a product".

Graham supported this opinion suggesting that robos need to offer something in addition such as education or advice to improve accessibility to invest.

"Personal savings in the UK is much lower than that in Australia and Singapore who are forced to put 10-15% of their income in to an ISA", Graham added.



Articles Featuring Tim Levene