Here's why it matters if you're engaged at work

By Kirstie McDermott on Friday 22 July 2022

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Jobbio's Kirstie McDermott takes a look into what disengagement at work can look like and why being engaged is so important.

Here's why it matters if you're engaged at work
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We hear a lot about why it is important for companies to engage their employees. Gallup's recent State of the Global Workplace: 2022 Report uncovered that employees who are not engaged or who are actively disengaged cost the world $7.8 trillion in lost productivity, according to, or 11 per cent of global GDP.

It’s all very well for companies to calculate the revenues lost by staff who are switched-off, therefore neatly passing blame. But what about you? Surely firms have responsibilities to manage their employee engagement – and how does the situation arise in the first place?

A 2021 State of Employee Engagement report found that 49 per cent of organisations with frontline workers saw engagement drop that year, and 36 per cent of firms with a mix of office and frontline saw engagement decline too.

There are lots of reasons why you could become disengaged at work. The pandemic, of course, is a huge factor for many of us; bad management and poor communication are others.

Below, we take a look at why being engaged matters – and what being disengaged can look like.

You are listened to

No one is happy at work all of the time. But being able to address issues as they arise, ask for help and know you’ll have access to reasonable accommodations is really important. Lack of communication leads to disengagement; you’re switched off, you doubt you’ll be listened to, and you won’t proffer any additional ideas or feedback that might just benefit the wider company goals.

You’re not burnt out

Burnout is a huge workplace issue right now. Glassdoor analysed employee reviews and found that mentions of burnout have increased 128 per cent since May 2021, around the time that lockdown restrictions started to ease. The site also surveyed 2,000 full-time UK employees, and found that 52 per cent said that work regularly ate into their personal life, and 35 per cent said they did not believe a healthy work-life balance was possible in their current role.

Researchers at Harvard Business School and New York University found that the number of meetings increased during the pandemic by 12.9 per cent, on average, and the number of attendees per meeting grew by 13.5 per cent. It all leads to a feeling of being a hamster on a wheel.

You do good work

A sense of purpose, the knowledge that the work you are doing matters and is contributing to a bigger picture is important for your own personal goals, but it is also the fuel that will drive your creativity and innovation at work. Having that spark allows you to do good work, contribute to great projects and come up with new ideas. So in the long run, it’ll benefit your career.


If your current employer isn’t cutting it on the engagement front, then you can do something about it. Here are three roles that are worth a look - and there are plenty more on the AltFi Job Board too.

QA Engineer - Verifications, Experian

As a QA Engineer you will have a passion for creating well designed, robust, reusable automated testing infrastructure. You will perform automation/manual quality assurance and testing on various applications that are central to the verifications business and engage in adopting test strategy to ensure high-quality output and involve in evolving QA processes. You’ll need strong previous testing experience in .Net Core 3.1 and C#, as well as more than two years’ of extensive experience in test management and automation tools (JIRA, Zephyr, Selenium, SpecFlow, Postman, REST APIs). Apply now.

Sales Director - Crypto, BVNK

BVNK is seeking an experienced, motivated, and proactive Sales Director - Crypto to join its global commercial team. You will have a network in the sector and can acquire, build and maintain relationships with clients, fully manage sales pipelines, including commercial negotiation and develop sales opportunities. You will need five years experience in sales or business development as well as a successful track record of building sales teams, managing relationships and closing business. Additionally, you’ll be experienced in successfully managing multiple sales processes and projects at the same time. Apply now.

Senior Back End Engineer, Thought Machine

A key role within Thought Machine, the Back End Engineer will lead the development of the Vault product. The company prides itself on excellence, adopting the best practices in continuous deployment monorepo style development. Development here is fast paced, and you will be expected to develop code to a high standard and production-ready state. You will design, implement and develop scalable, performant microservices using best practices, write automated unit tests and integrate tests. You’ll need more than five years’ of experience as a Software Engineer, experience with either Python or Golang and experience in developing automated tests as an integral part of the development cycle. Apply now.

 

For more inspiring roles in this space every single week, check out the AltFi Job Board

This article was provided by Jobbio and does not necessarily reflect the views of AltFi.

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Companies in this Article:

Thought Machine

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