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Angel investment platform launches to close the gender investment gap

“We're building a new table and we're welcoming eligible women and ally investors who recognise the need for change to pull up a chair.”

Obu angel investing

Sarah King & Claire Dunn / Obu/Karina Lyburn.

A new online angel investing platform is launching in the UK to help close the gender investment gap, both increasing the number of female investors and connecting more female-founded businesses to capital.

Currently, women make up just 14 per cent of angel investors in the UK, but angel investment platform Obu aims to increase this to 30 per cent by 2030.

Eligible female-founded businesses will be connected to angels, both women and allies, who share in co-founders Sarah King and Claire Dunn’s mission to create a more “equal, progressive, innovative” startup ecosystem. 

“The Obu Platform and Collective have been designed with women angels in mind — the customer journeys, the way information is presented, the language we use, the guidance we provide has all been built to disrupt and demystify investment,” King continued.

“We're building a new table and we're welcoming eligible women and ally investors who recognise the need for change to pull up a chair.”

In 2021, King and Dunn led a campaign titled Over Being Underfunded in 2021 to highlight the inequalities in the investment sector for women-founded businesses

With Obu, they aim to educate and support nascent angel investors through a collective alongside connecting them to female-founded businesses they will be able to offer both funding and expertise.

The platform will focus on female-founded businesses in fintech, AI, edtech, femtech, food and drink, and the health and beauty sectors seeking up to £250,000.

In 2022, less than 2p in every £1 went to all-female founding teams, and they only received around 6 per cent of VC funding.

The inequalities in investment are particularly high for Black female founders, who received just 0.02 per cent of VC funding over the last 10 years.

“More women, especially black women, need to become angel investors,” Kinhub co-founder and Extend Ventures head of research Erika Brodnock said.

“Obu is opening a pathway to eligible women from all ethnic backgrounds, regions, and classes to invest within their means to create positive economic futures for themselves and for their families and communities.”

Obu is open to all eligible investors who share in the organisation’s mission to close the gender investment gap.

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